When someone offers you a glass of water, what’s your response? If you’re thirsty and it’s a hot day, satisfying your thirst, at least in the U.S., is a pleasure you don’t have to think much about.

Where we work in India, a glass of water is potentially dangerous.

Having been hospitalized in India with typhoid (transmitted through a fecal-oral route — YES, poop to mouth), I’ve experienced the implications of water pollution firsthand. How does this happen? How does water get so dirty that it can kill you? Simply put, water pollution occurs when unprocessed sewage or industrial waste ends up in the public water supply.

For us, in Delhi, where our production center is located, the issue is endemic. Delhi has been crowned the world’s 5th most polluted city. We’re a stone’s throw away from the Yamuna River, which according to a Google Maps review (I know, what a strange world we live in), has “very poor water condition.” That’s an understatement. When I first started spending time in India a little over a decade ago, people would still bathe in the river. Now, the smell of sewage and industrial water is so pervasive it’s hard to even pass by in a moving vehicle. The river is technically “dead”, a painful term often used when a river cannot sustain life in any way.

A man looks for recyclable items on the banks of the Yamuna, on the outskirts of New Delhi. Photograph: Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images

To add insult to injury, this situation is especially tough for the many folks in India who are already struggling to meet basic food needs. Baseline, to get clean water one has to either purchase it for a premium from local water vendors or they have to invest in a water filtration system that in and of itself can cost more than what low-income folks earn in a month, and even then, these systems are not effective if the water is TOO dirty.

In an effort to learn more about this systemic issue our team recently watched RiverBlue, a documentary highlighting how the fashion industry contributes to the pollution of waterways (and thus straight up kills people) all over the world. We wanted to share with you some of our learnings, and why choices in the fabric purchasing process are essential to curbing water pollution.

What’s the Deal with Water Pollution in the Fashion Industry?

Well, water is a key player in the supply chain. Water pollution can actually be the result of many different stages throughout the production process. Let’s take for example, a cotton t-shirt. A large part of the production process surrounds the harvesting of the cotton. However, if that cotton isn’t being sourced organically, there is a high chance it may be getting treated with harmful chemicals and pesticides that the rain ends up washing away. 

A textile manufacturing plant in Tianjin, China. Credit: Lu Guang/Greenpeace

Now we fast forward and that cotton has been spun into fabric that will later be sewn into your new favorite t-shirt, but first the yarn/material needs to be dyed. In order to achieve the requested color, workers have to mix a variety of different chemicals and dyes together to get that color just right. These dyes could contain toxins such as AZO dyes, which are so bad they have actually been banned in certain countries. Not only can this harm workers, but if these toxins are not disposed of properly they then go and wreak havoc in the environment. The garment dyeing process is no simple process and can sometimes include dyeing that yarn/fabric/t-shirt several times to get it just right.

Water pollution is the most notable impact of clothing production, with around 20 percent of global industrial water pollution traceable directly back to the textiles industry.

When you look at that finished garment, it is impossible to know what all went into creating it. What were the conditions like during production? How much water was used throughout the process? And most importantly…

How is Water Waste Discarded After Being Used in the Garment Production Process?

Where does it continue or end its lifespan? That water waste or “sludge” can be defined as all of the leftover chemicals and toxins extracted after producing a garment. Unfortunately, oftentimes the answer to that question is that it ends up getting dumped into nearby waterways where some people see it as, “out of sight, out of mind”. I cannot stress how common this is, with  75%-80% of waterways in India polluted. I know, heartbreaking. 

Taylor McCleneghan, a dear friend and advisor for WORK+SHELTER,  as well as co-founder of Taylor Tall has visited textile production factories all over India. She explained that during her time there, she has witnessed firsthand how some factories dispose of their water waste. One process she described seeing included several filtration or separating stages and then finally an evaporation stage where the sun was used to evaporate remaining water, leaving only the waste. The compacted waste then gets picked up by a waste management specialist and taken to a facility to be disposed of properly.

 

Taylor McCleneghan, co-founder of Taylor Tall.

But the issue is complicated. Well-resourced factories have the best chance of accommodating regulations by investing into water waste management systems. Small scale factories can have a harder time investing in these systems. In low-income areas, this becomes more than an environmental problem, it becomes a case of ethics. These factory workers need their jobs in order to make an income to support themselves and their families, however if the factories are not disposing of their water waste properly then all of the employees become at risk, along with those living in nearby communities.

How Does WORK+SHELTER Cut Down on Water Pollution?

One option is to pressure mills to build proper water waste management infrastructure over time. This requires serious relationships in order for them to see that the downside of NOT building this infrastructure will cost them over time. It also requires the willingness to spend more on fabric upfront, since the mills have to cover the costs of this infrastructure somewhere, and accessing capital in developing markets can be especially tough.

Another more direct option is to only purchase certified materials. For us, over 70% of the fabrics we purchase are GOTS certified. GOTS, also known as the Global Organic Textile Standard, aims to define requirements that ensure organic status of textiles, from harvesting the raw materials, through environmentally and socially responsible manufacturing up to labeling in order to provide a credible assurance to the end consumer. Basically, to be GOTS certified means that the clothing or textiles are made through a sustainable process, using organically grown fibers. 

Organic cotton is grown without toxic chemicals, but unless the clothes are certified under GOTS, bluesign®, or Oeko-Tex certifications, toxic chemicals may be added in the textile production process.

When being considered for a GOTS certification, fabrics undergo a heavy investigation to ensure that the fabrics are the real deal. Remember those scary AZO dyes we mentioned earlier? A large part of the GOTS certification process involves checking fabric production processes to ensure there are no AZO dyes or other harmful dyes being used in the production process.

 

Pieces from our Client, Alex Pawlowska of Looking for Heroes, including the red Warrior Dress + the Power Tee both made from GOTS certified organic cotton.

 

While water pollution is a very serious issue in the broader fashion and promotional products industries, we are super excited about being able to provide access to eco-friendly materials for our clients. If you have any specific questions about our sustainable solutions and goals, or if you’re curious about our in-stock GOTS certified fabric offerings, drop us a line by emailing [email protected] or schedule a meeting here.

Much health and happiness to you and yours,

 Theresa

 

Theresa VanderMeer

Founder + CEO of W+S

 

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